Gastrojejunostomy for the treatment of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux State after the Anti-Reflux Functions

Gastrojejunostomy for the treatment of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux State after the Anti-Reflux Functions

Grover and you may Kothari (2015) reported that patient satisfaction that have number 1 anti-reflux functions is higher, however, a small % regarding clients sense perennial reflux and you may dysphagia, demanding re-operation. The top anatomic reasons for were not successful fundoplication try slipped fundoplication, failure to recognize a primary esophagus, and you can problems with brand new wrap. Minimally intrusive surgery has-been more prevalent of these procedures. Choices for surgery were redo fundoplication with hiatal hernia fix when the called for, transformation to help you RNY anatomy, or, just like the a past resort, esophagectomy. This review didn’t give people health-related data; however, they did mention the research because of the Awais et al (2008) and you will Makris ainsi que al (2012).

This new people said that conversion process so you can RNY structure had a leading rate of success, rendering it method an important solution from the properly selected diligent

Awais and co-workers (2008) stated that intractable GERD after prior anti-reflux operation presents a difficult challenge. These investigators examined the role of Roux-en-Y near esophago-jejunostomy (RNYNEJ) in the management of intractable reflux symptoms Green Singles after prior anti-reflux surgery. Between , a total of 25 patients with GERD after anti-reflux surgery underwent RNYNEJ. The end-points evaluated were improvement in GERD symptoms using the GERD-Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) scale, overall patient satisfaction, overall patient weight loss, and improvement of co-morbid conditions. There were 4 men and 21 women (mean age of 51 years; range of 35 to 74); 72 % had a BMI of greater than 30; 44 % had more than 1 anti-reflux surgery and 40 % had a previous Collis gastroplasty. The peri-operative mortality was 0 %; 6 patients (24 %) developed major post-operative complications, including anastomotic leak (n = 2) and Roux-limb obstruction (n = 1). The median length of stay (LOS) was 6 days; 80 % of the patients reported satisfaction at mean follow-up time of 16.5 months. Their BMI reduced from 35.8 to 27.7 (p < 0.001); 73 % of co-morbid conditions were improved and the GERD HRQL score improved from 29.9 to 7.3 (p < 0.001). The authors concluded that the RNYNEJ for persistent GERD after prior anti-reflux surgery was technically challenging with significant morbidity. However, the majority of the patients reported satisfaction with significant improvement in symptoms. Many patients had associated benefits of weight loss and improvement in co-morbid conditions. They stated that RNYNEJ should be considered as an important option for the treatment of intractable GERD after prior anti-reflux surgery, particularly in the obese. Moreover, they stated that there is a need to further investigate and analyze patient variables that influence outcomes because this may help physicians/surgeons to better select patients for a particular type of operation. They noted that these variables need to be prospectively studied to define optimal candidates, and further work is needed for optimizing patient selection. This was a small study (n = 25) with short-term follow-up (mean of 16.5 months).

There was an increase in reported nausea (0-1, p < 0

Makris and colleagues (2012) stated that revisionary fundoplication is the mainstay of treatment for failed previous fundoplication, but is not always feasible. These investigators reported their experience with use of short-limb RNY reconstruction for failed anti-reflux procedures. Prospectively collected data were retrospectively analyzed for morbidity, mortality, pre- and post-procedure symptom scores (scale 0 to 3), BMI, and patient satisfaction (scale 1 to 10). A total of 72 patients with 1 to 4 (median 1) previous anti-reflux procedures underwent RNY reconstruction, either to gastric pouch (n = 64) or to the esophagus (n = 8). There were 37 laparoscopic, 24 open abdominal, and 2 combined thoracic-abdominal procedures; 9 additional patients underwent conversion from laparoscopy to open surgery. Mean follow-up of 20.7 months (± 12.9 months) was available in 63 (88 %) patients. The overall median scores for heart-burn, regurgitation, dysphagia, chest pain, and nausea were 0 or 1. There were 72 major and minor complications noted that affected 33 (46 %) patients, with no in-hospital or 30-day mortality observed. The most common complications were anastomotic strictures, bowel obstructions, respiratory complications, and dumping. Mean post-operative BMI was 24.6 (± 4.4) kg/m(2) compared with pre-operative BMI of 31.4 (± 6.1) kg/m(2). Mean reported satisfaction score was 8.2 (± 2.1), and 89 % of the patients would recommend the procedure to a friend. Pre- and post-operative symptoms could be compared in 57 patients, and significant decrease in median symptom scores for heart-burn (2-0, p < 0.05), regurgitation (1-0, p < 0.05), and dysphagia (2-0, p < 0.05) was confirmed. 05). The authors concluded that short-limb RNY reconstruction was an effective remedial procedure for a subset of patients with failed anti-reflux surgery, but morbidity was significant. Moreover, they stated that the main drawback of this study was retrospective studies performed on prospective databases. Furthermore, they stated that studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate these findings.

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